Property and Casualty Insurance Information for Auto,
Homeowner, Renters, Liability, Workers Compensation and More


Avoid Vehicle-Deer Collisions

There are steps you can take to decrease the likelihood of being involved in a deer-vehicle collision. The Georgia Department of Natural Resources estimates that the white-tail deer population is slightly more than 1 million. A significant number of the deer are found in North Georgia. Getting educated and taking precautions can make a difference.

The following facts can be helpful in avoiding deer-related collisions:
  • Deer aren't just found on rural roads near wooded areas. Many deer crashes occur on busy highways near cities.
  • Deer are unpredictable, especially when faced with glaring headlights, blowing horns and fast-moving vehicles. They often dart into traffic.
  • Deer often move in groups. If you see one, there are likely more in the vicinity.
When driving, the Georgia Insurance Information Service (GIIS) recommends taking the following precautions:
  • Drive with caution when moving through deer-crossing zones, in areas known to have a large deer population and in areas where roads divide agricultural fields from forestland.
  • Always wear your seat belt and stay awake, alert and sober.
  • When driving at night, use high beam headlights when there is no oncoming traffic. The high beams will better illuminate the eyes of deer on or near the roadway.
  • Be especially attentive from sunset to midnight and during the hours shortly before and after sunrise. These are the highest risk times for deer-vehicle collisions.
  • Brake firmly when you notice a deer in or near your path, but stay in your lane. Many serious crashes occur when drivers swerve to avoid a deer and hit another vehicle or lose control of their cars.
  • Do not rely on devices such as deer whistles, deer fences and reflectors to deter deer. These devices have not proven effective.
In the event your vehicle strikes a deer, try to avoid going near or touching the animal. A frightened and wounded deer can hurt you or further injure itself, warned the GIIS. If the deer is blocking the roadway and poses a danger to other motorists, you should call the police immediately.

Contact your insurance agent or company representative as quickly as possible to report any damage to your car. Collision with a deer or other animals is covered under the comprehensive portion of your automobile policy.